End Death By Incarceration Art Show & Contest

Please vote for your favorite piece in each of the categories – Artists in Prison and Artists in Solidarity – vote by October 7th.

Winners will be announced by October 15th.

We extended the deadline until September 30th for incarcerated artists with the caveat that the sooner they get their pieces in the more chances they have for votes.

Because of Covid we had more trouble getting the word out as people in prison were more restricted from each other so they couldn’t as easily pass the word along.

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COOK COUNTY JAIL: Death Trap

The day after her husband died on Easter Sunday, Cassandra Greer-Lee’s emotions swung from shock to pain to confusion. She wondered whether she did everything she could to save Nickolas Lee from the rapid spread of coronavirus inside Cook County Jail.

She thought of the long stream of calls she had frantically dialed over the past few weeks as Cook County Jail rapidly cemented itself as the largest-known source of coronavirus cases in the U.S.

Scrolling through her calls, the numbers ballooned from 60 to 70 to 90 to 100 to finally 132 calls made to the sheriff’s office, a jail sergeant’s desk line, the jail hospital and others to alert them to the spread of coronavirus on Lee’s tier—almost all were unanswered.

Lee was the third of seven detainees who have died after contracting the virus at Cook County Jail. Since then, almost 1,000 Cook County Jail employees and detainees have tested positive for COVID-19; two corrections officers and one court deputy have also died.

Like 98 percent of inmates at Cook County Jail, Lee was awaiting trial.

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THE LONG TERM

The Long Term is a hand-drawn animation developed by artists serving long term sentences.

The video uses personal narrative and research to describe the scale and impact of long term sentencing policies. The work tells the stories about the fear of dying inside, the feeling of being programmed by prison and the impact on family life, from the perspective of 11 artists serving life or long term sentences.

The Sentencing Project reports that 1 in 9 people in prison are serving life sentences, and 1 in 7 have sentences of fifty years or more.

People locked in, or headed to, maximum security prisons are marked for death-by-incarceration.

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YOU’RE INVITED & NEEDED: Hope To See You There

Join us for a public hearing on the current conditions that incarcerated people are facing under the COVID-19 pandemic and how communities inside and out are building up the practices and institutions that support healthy and self-determined communities during COVID-19.

And beyond.

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GEORGE FLOYD LOCKDOWN: Federal Bureau Of Prisons Locks Down Prisoners

After protests broke out in response to George Floyd’s death, the agency ordered the first nationwide lockdown in 25 years.

The Federal Bureau of Prisons ordered prisoners confined to cells and stripped of outside communications.

“You’re kind of confirming why we’re in the situation we’re in as a country, where the rage has erupted because people are sick of the oppression, particularly against minorities. Cops were comfortable with the actions they were taking against George Floyd with someone filming so closely.”

“Just imagine what goes on inside prisons.”

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SIGN THE PETITION: PLEASE & THANK YOU

The COVID-19 crisis in U.S. prisons has shone a light on the horrific conditions and overcrowding that have turned many prisons into death traps.

But it is only a reminder of the fate of many people incarcerated in Illinois who face death-by-incarceration every year, due to decades of extreme and inhumane sentencing policies.

Victims of crime, convicted people, and their loved ones all suffer when people are locked up for years beyond the needs of public safety. Nearly every other state has mechanisms to release long-term incarcerated individuals who are ready to rejoin society. Illinois does not.

If nothing changes, over 5,000 Illinoisans will be required to grow old and die in prison.

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JOIN US. PLEASE AND THANK YOU.

The COVID-19 crisis in U.S. prisons has shone a light on the horrific conditions and overcrowding that have turned many prisons into death traps.

But it is only a reminder of the fate of many people incarcerated in Illinois who face death by incarceration every year, due to decades of extreme sentencing policies.

Join us for a discussion of the current conditions that incarcerated people are enduring under the COVID-19 pandemic and how communities inside and outside are building up the resources, practices, and institutions that support healthy and self-determined communities during COVID-19 and beyond.

Our People’s Tribunal on May 21st will uplift calls for life-saving measures to address the needs of prisoners and loved ones during the pandemic – and long term visions of abolishing death by incarceration and building healthy, safe, and vibrant communities.

We will be joined by incarcerated and formerly incarcerated organizers; their family members; leading thinkers about criminalization; elected officials; and advocates who care deeply about rethinking punishment and criminalization in the state of Illinois.

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